• Please remember that my hours are 7:45-3:15 Monday - Friday. If you need help outside of that time, of course I will respond but it could take longer that normal.

    If you need help with any of the quizzes, please contact me!

    Week 05/04/2020-05/08/2020 

    Video reading of quiz

    Week 5 vocab

    Week 5 vocab quiz

    Week 5 quiz

    Youtube video summary (this does not replace the selection reading)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZfBD0OCVo6U

     DO NOT PLAGIARIZE

    Summary in Word Doc Week 5 Word doc

    Summary and Analysis Act I: Scene 3

    Summary

    That evening, Cicero and Casca meet on a street in Rome. There has been a terrible storm, and Casca describes to Cicero the unnatural phenomena that have occurred: An owl hooted in the marketplace at noon, the sheeted dead rose out of their graves, and so on. Cicero then departs and Cassius enters. He interprets the supernatural happenings as divine warnings that Caesar threatens to destroy the Republic. He urges Casca to work with him in opposing Caesar. When Cinna, another conspirator, joins them, Cassius urges him to throw a message through Brutus' window and to take other steps that will induce Brutus to participate in the plot. The three conspirators, now firmly united in an attempt to unseat Caesar, agree to meet with others of their party — Decius Brutus, Trebonius, and Metellus Cimber — at Pompey's Porch. They are confident that they will soon win Brutus to their cause.

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    Please remember that my hours are 7:45-3:15 Monday - Friday. If you need help outside of that time, of course I will respond but it could take longer that normal.

    If you need help with any of the quizzes, please contact me!

    Week 04/27/2020-05/01/2020 

    Video  ELAIIP-A04272020

    Week 4 vocab

    Week 4 vocab quiz

    Week 4 reading quiz

    Youtube video summary (this does not replace the selection reading)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ibzqdoV-BcU

    DO NOT PLAGIARIZE

     Summary:

    Act 2, Scene 1

    Brutus is brought into the plot against Caesar
     
    Brutus is awake late at night. He tries to justify killing Caesar, saying that although Caesar seems honorable now, there is too great a risk that he may be corrupted by power. Brutus reads one of the letters that was left for him. The letter accuses him of not taking action to prevent corruption in Rome.

    When Cassius and the conspirators visit Brutus, he agrees to kill Caesar, but argues against swearing an oath because that the nobility of the group and the fact they have all discussed the act together means they should not need an oath to keep their resolution. Decius Brutus asks if they should kill anyone else besides Caesar, and Cassius suggests Mark Antony, but Brutus strongly opposes the idea on both moral and practical grounds, and the others follow his lead.

    Eventually the conspirators decide to split up, and Decius Brutus volunteers to make sure Caesar makes it to the Capitol the next day. Brutus’ wife Portia comes in and demands to know what Brutus has been keeping from her. Brutus praises her but says he must wait a little longer to tell her. The sick Caius Ligarius enters, and when Brutus tells him of the plot against Caesar, he immediately agrees to join and resolves to be well again.

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    Week 04/20/2020-04/24/2020

    ELA II Pope/Atkinson

     

    Reteach Video

    Vocabulary and assignment

    ELA II Pope/Atkinson 04202020

    Youtube video summary (this does not replace the selection reading)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZfBD0OCVo6U

    DO NOT PLAGIARIZE

    The summary is now included on the Vocabulary assignment titled ELA II Pope/Atkinson 04202020

     

    Week 04/13/2020-04/17/2020

    Please contact me if you have any questions on the reading! tina.atkinson@estancia.k12.nm.us

    505-384-2001 ex 2329

    Video Lesson

    Here is a summary and an analysis to help you understand Act 1, Scene 2

     

    Julius Caesar Act 1, Scene 2 Summary

    Please note that these videos are not a replacement for the reading. Read first, then listen/watch the video to help clarify. 

    Scene Summary Video

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oTDRyCulF2o

     

    Week 04/06/2020-04/10/2020

    Please contact me if you have any questions on the reading! tina.atkinson@estancia.k12.nm.us

    Video Lesson

    Here is a summary and an analysis to help you understand Act 1, Scene 1

     

    Julius Caesar Act 1, Scene 1 Summary

    Scene Summary

    Two representatives of the Roman government, Marullus and Flavius, confront a crowd of commoners and demand to know why they are celebrating. A witty cobbler and a carpenter explain that they are celebrating the recent military victory of Julius Caesar over a rival in the Roman government, Pompey. Flavius chastises the commoners for their fickle loyalty, and he and Marullus decide to tear down decorations that were put up to celebrate Caesar’s victory.

     

    Julius Caesar Act 1, Scene 1 Analysis

    Although the play opens with Flavius and Murellus noting the fickle nature of the public’s devotion—the crowd now celebrates Caesar’s defeat of Pompey when once it celebrated Pompey’s victories—loyalty to Caesar nonetheless appears to be growing with exceptional force. Caesar’s power and influence are likewise strong: Flavius and Murellus are later punished for removing the decorations from Caesar’s statues.

    It is interesting to note the difference between the manner in which Flavius and Murellus conceive of the cobbler and that in which Shakespeare has created him. The cobbler is a typically Shakespearean character—a host of puns and bawdy references reveal his dexterity with language (“all that I live by is with the awl. I meddle / with no tradesman’s matters, nor women’s matters” [I.i.2122]). The tribunes, however, preoccupied with class distinctions, view the cobbler as nothing more than a plebeian ruffian. Flavius’s reproach of the cobbler for not having his tools about him on a workday reveals his belief that a laborer can be good for one thing and one thing only: laboring. Murellus similarly assumes the cobbler is stupid, although, ironically, it is Murellus himself who misunderstands the cobbler’s answers to his questions. Murellus is unwilling to interpret the cobbler’s shift in allegiance from Pompey to Caesar as anything but a manifestation of dim-witted forgetfulness.

    Flavius and Murellus’s concern about Caesar’s meteoric rise to power reflects English sentiment during the Elizabethan age about the consolidation of power in other parts of Europe. The strengthening of the absolutist monarchies in such sovereignties as France and Spain during the sixteenth century threatened the stability of the somewhat more balanced English political system, which, though it was hardly democratic in the modern sense of the word, at least provided nobles and elected representatives with some means of checking royal authority. Caesar’s ascendance helped to effect Rome’s transition from republic to empire, and Shakespeare’s depiction of the prospect of Caesar’s assumption of dictatorial power can be seen as a comment upon the gradual shift toward centralization of power that was taking place in Europe.

    In addition, Shakespeare’s illustration of the fickleness of the Roman public proves particularly relevant to the English political scene of the time. Queen Elizabeth I was nearing the end of her life but had neither produced nor named an heir. Anxiety mounted concerning who her successor would be. People feared that without resort to the established, accepted means of transferring power—passing it down the family line—England might plunge into the sort of chaotic power struggle that had plagued it in the fifteenth century, during the Wars of the Roses. Flavius and Murellus’s interest in controlling the populace lays the groundwork for Brutus’s and Antony’s manipulations of public opinion after Caesar’s death. Shakespeare thus makes it clear that the struggle for power will involve a battle among the leaders to win public favor with displays of bravery and convincing rhetoric. Considering political history in the centuries after Shakespeare wrote Julius Caesar, especially in the twentieth century, when Benito Mussolini and Adolf Hitler consolidated their respective regimes by whipping up in the masses the overzealous nationalism that had pervaded nineteenth-century Italy and Germany, the play is remarkably prescient.