• Please remember that my hours are 7:45-3:15 Monday - Friday. If you need help outside of that time, of course I will respond but it could take longer that normal.

    If you need help with any of the quizzes, please contact me!

    Week 05/04/2020-05/08/2020 

    Reading of quiz Video

    Week 5 vocab

    Week 5 vocab quiz

    Week 5 quiz

    Video and text summary (this does not replace the selection reading)

    https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Romeo-and-Juliet/act-1-scene-5-summary/

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    Week5 Summary in Word doc

    Romeo and Juliet | Act 1, Scene 5 | Summary

    Summary

    The Capulets' party begins. After servants bustle through, cheerfully readying the house for the party, Lord Capulet welcomes his guests with a funny speech in which he reminisces fondly about his younger days of dancing and courting women. He invites his younger guests to dance now in his place. Romeo sees Juliet for the first time and is instantly struck by her beauty.

    Tybalt, a Capulet nephew, recognizes in the masked Romeo the voice of a Montague and alerts Lord Capulet to the trespasser's presence. Lord Capulet, however, wants to "let him alone," to which Tybalt temporarily agrees and leaves.

    Left alone, Romeo approaches Juliet, takes her hand, and kisses it as they exchange their first words. Romeo calls Juliet a "holy shrine," likening her to a "saint" and his sinful lips to two devoted "pilgrims" ready to repent with a kiss. They flirt and kiss, twice, before the nurse interrupts them to tell Juliet her mother is looking for her, revealing to Romeo that Juliet is the daughter of his father's enemy. When he leaves as the party ends, Juliet asks the nurse to learn his name. "My only love sprung from my only hate!" Juliet responds when she learns who he is.

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    Please remember that my hours are 7:45-3:15 Monday - Friday. If you need help outside of that time, of course I will respond but it could take longer that normal.

    If you need help with any of the quizzes, please contact me!

    Week 04/27/2020-05/01/2020 

    Video

    Week 4 vocab

    Youtube video summary (this does not replace the selection reading)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gAG2qtd8s4w

    DO NOT PLAGIARIZE

    Summary:

    Romeo, Benvolio, and their friend Mercutio, all wearing masks, have gathered with a group of mask-wearing guests on their way to the Capulets’ feast. Still melancholy, Romeo wonders how they will get into the Capulets’ feast, since they are Montagues. When that concern is brushed aside, he states that he will not dance at the feast. Mercutio begins to gently mock Romeo, transforming all of Romeo’s statements about love into blatantly sexual metaphors. Romeo refuses to engage in this banter, explaining that in a dream he learned that going to the feast was a bad idea. Mercutio responds with a long speech about Queen Mab of the fairies, who visits people’s dreams. The speech begins as a flight of fancy, but Mercutio becomes almost entranced by it, and a bitter, fervent strain creeps in. Romeo steps in to stop the speech and calm Mercutio down. Mercutio admits that he has been talking of nothing, noting that dreams are but “the children of an idle brain” (1.4.97).

    Benvolio refocuses their attention on actually getting to the feast. Romeo voices one last concern: he has a feeling that the night’s activities will set in motion the action of fate, resulting in untimely death. But, putting himself in the hands of “he who hath the steerage of my course,” Romeo’s spirits rise, and he continues with his friends toward the feast (1.4.112).

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    Week 04/20/2020-04/24/2020

    ELA I Pope/Atkinson

    ELA I reteach

     

    Vocabulary and assignment

    ELA I 1st Pope/Atkinson 04202020

    Youtube video summary (this does not replace the selection reading)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s0LA4e6Kyw4

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    The summary is now included on the Vocabulary assignment titled ELA I 1st Pope/Atkinson 04202020

     

    Week 04/13/2020-04/17/2020

    ELA I Pope/Atkinson

    Re-Teach Video  Video Lesson

    (copy link and paste in browser if needed)

    https://www.loom.com/share/dbf18e266e5d44b1b670f379fa6967e6

     

    Vocabulary hard copy

    Vocab Romeo & Juliet Act 1 Scene 2

     

    Youtube Video Romeo and Juliet Act 1, Scene 2 (copy link and paste in browser)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x6VVZoFNJLo

    DO NOT PLAGIARIZE

    Put your summary in your own words!!!!!

    Scene 2 Summary

    The Marriage Proposal

    This scene opens with Capulet and Paris walking and talking on the streets of Verona. Paris wants to marry Juliet, Capulet's only daughter. Of course Capulet doesn't want to lose his only daughter. She's not even 14 years old yet! He uses the term soon married, soon marred to get Paris to understand that marrying too early will be harmful, but Paris doesn't care about her age.

    Instead of agreeing to Paris's offer of marriage, Capulet invites Paris to a feast, or party, that he is having at his house that evening. He tells Paris to come and look at all the beautiful women. Who knows: he may find one that he likes more than Juliet. If not, Capulet tells him to woo Juliet and let her make the final decision.

    Romeo's Invitation to the Feast

    After their chat, Capulet gives the Clown a list of people to invite to the party. Unfortunately for Capulet, but fortunately for Romeo, the Clown can't read. He sees Romeo walking on the street and asks him to read the list for him.

    Romeo reads the list and some of his sadness fades when he reads that Rosaline, the girl he is in love with, is one of the guests. There are several other young ladies named, but Romeo doesn't pay attention to that part.

    The Clown invites Romeo to attend, providing that he's not a Montague (which he is, but he doesn't tell the Clown that).

    Entertaining Thoughts of Other Women

    Benvolio immediately thinks about the other young girls who will be at the party and urges Romeo to consider going to see them. His instructions are similar to the instructions Capulet gave Paris. Go and look at the others and maybe someone else will catch your eye.

    Romeo still denies that there is anyone who could capture his attention like Rosaline, and he even wishes himself harm if he finds one. Benvolio suggests that the only reason why Rosaline seems so lovely is because Romeo has no one to compare her to. Romeo does agree to attend the party for his own reasons, not to prove Benvolio right.

    tina.atkinson@estancia.k12.nm.us

    505-384-2001 ex 2329

     

    Week 04/06/2020-04/10/2020

    ELA I Pope/Atkinson

     Video Lesson

    Re-Teach Video (copy link and paste in browser if needed)

    https://www.loom.com/share/28b8b9e5dcf9457c8c411374fa29e6cd

     

    Youtube Video Romeo and Juliet Act 1, Scene 1 (copy link and paste in browser)

    https://youtu.be/XgdJeTH0lG4

    Please contact me if you have any questions

    tina.atkinson@estancia.k12.nm.us

    505-384-2001 ex 2329

    OPTIONAL Here is a summary and an analysis to help you understand Act 1, Scene 1, this is optional reading

    Romeo and Juliet, Act 1, Scene 1 Summary

    The play opens with two servants from the house of Capulet talking about their hatred of the Montagues. They meet two servants from the house of Montague and a fight breaks out. Benvolio tries to stop the fight but when Tybalt arrives things get worse. With his line 'As I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee: / Have at thee, coward!' the fight escalates until there is a huge street brawl involving both Lord Montague and Lord Capulet. The fight is eventually stopped when the Prince stops everyone saying 'On pain of torture, from those bloody hands / Throw your mistemper'd weapons to the ground'. He is so angry he proclaims if there is another fight Montague and Capulet shall pay the ‘forfeit’ for it with their lives. Everyone departs leaving Lord and Lady Montague talking to Benvolio about their son Romeo, who has been missing all day. Benvolio promises to find out where Romeo has been and what’s upsetting him. Romeo reveals to Benvolio that he is in love with Rosaline but she doesn’t love him in return.

    In an opening full of rousing action that is sure to capture the audience’s attention (and designed partly for that purpose), Shakespeare provides all the background information needed to understand the world of the play. In the brawl, he portrays all of the layers of Veronese society, from those lowest in power, the servants, to the Prince who occupies the political and social pinnacle. He further provides excellent characterization of Benvolio as thoughtful and fearful of the law, Tybalt as a hothead, and Romeo as distracted and lovelorn, while showing the deep and long-standing hatred between the Montagues and Capulets. At the same time, Shakespeare establishes some of the major themes of the play. The opening of Romeo and Juliet is a marvel of economy, descriptive power, and excitement.

    The origin of the brawl, rife as it is with sexual and physical bravado, introduces the important theme of masculine honor. Masculine honor does not function in the play as some sort of stoic indifference to pain or insult. In Verona, a man must defend his honor whenever it is transgressed against, whether verbally or physically. This concept of masculine honor exists through every layer of society in Verona, from the servants on up to the noblemen. It animates Samson and Gregory as much as it does Tybalt.

    It is significant that the fight between the Montagues and Capulets erupts first among the servants. Readers of the play generally focus on the two great noble families, as they should. But do not overlook Shakespeare’s inclusion of servants in the story: the perspectives of servants in Romeo and Juliet are often used to comment on the actions of their masters, and therefore, society. When servants appear in the play, don’t just dismiss them as props meant to make the world of Romeo and Juliet look realistic. The things servants say often change the way we can look at the play, showing that while the Montagues and Capulets are gloriously tragic, they are also supremely privileged and stupid, since only the stupid would bring death upon themselves when there is no need for it. The prosaic cares of the lower classes display the difficulty of their lives; a difficulty that the Capulets and Montagues would not have to face were they not so blinded by honor and hatred.

    In an opening full of rousing action that is sure to capture the audience’s attention (and designed partly for that purpose), Shakespeare provides all the background information needed to understand the world of the play. In the brawl, he portrays all of the layers of Veronese society, from those lowest in power, the servants, to the Prince who occupies the political and social pinnacle. He further provides excellent characterization of Benvolio as thoughtful and fearful of the law, Tybalt as a hothead, and Romeo as distracted and lovelorn, while showing the deep and long-standing hatred between the Montagues and Capulets. At the same time, Shakespeare establishes some of the major themes of the play. The opening of Romeo and Juliet is a marvel of economy, descriptive power, and excitement.

    The origin of the brawl, rife as it is with sexual and physical bravado, introduces the important theme of masculine honor. Masculine honor does not function in the play as some sort of stoic indifference to pain or insult. In Verona, a man must defend his honor whenever it is transgressed against, whether verbally or physically. This concept of masculine honor exists through every layer of society in Verona, from the servants on up to the noblemen. It animates Samson and Gregory as much as it does Tybalt.

    It is significant that the fight between the Montagues and Capulets erupts first among the servants. Readers of the play generally focus on the two great noble families, as they should. But do not overlook Shakespeare’s inclusion of servants in the story: the perspectives of servants in Romeo and Juliet are often used to comment on the actions of their masters, and therefore, society. When servants appear in the play, don’t just dismiss them as props meant to make the world of Romeo and Juliet look realistic. The things servants say often change the way we can look at the play, showing that while the Montagues and Capulets are gloriously tragic, they are also supremely privileged and stupid, since only the stupid would bring death upon themselves when there is no need for it. The prosaic cares of the lower classes display the difficulty of their lives; a difficulty that the Capulets and Montagues would not have to face were they not so blinded by honor and hatred.

    In the figures of the civil watch and the Prince, the brawl introduces the audience to a different aspect of the social world of Verona that exists beyond the Montagues and Capulets. This social world stands in constant contrast to the passions inherent in the Capulets and Montagues. The give-and-take between the demands of the social world and individuals’ private passions is another powerful theme in the play. For example, look at how the servants try to attain their desire while remaining on the right side of the law. Note how careful Samson is to ask, “Is the law on our side, if I say ‘Ay,’” before insulting the Montagues (1.1.42). After the Prince institutes the death penalty for any who disturb the peace again, the stakes for letting private passions overwhelm public sobriety are raised to a new level.

    Finally, this first scene also introduces us to Romeo the lover. But that introduction comes with a bit of a shock. In a play called Romeo and Juliet we would expect the forlorn Romeo to be lovesick over Juliet. But instead he is in love with Rosaline. Who is Rosaline? The question lingers through the play. She never appears onstage, but many of Romeo’s friends, unaware that he has fallen in love with and married Juliet, believe he is in love with Rosaline for the entirety of the play. And Friar Lawrence, for one, expresses shock that Romeo’s affections could shift so quickly from Rosaline to Juliet. In this way, Rosaline haunts Romeo and Juliet. One can argue that Rosaline exists in the play only to demonstrate Romeo’s passionate nature, his love of love. For example, in the clichés he spouts about his love for Rosaline: “Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health” (1.1.173). It seems that Romeo’s love for chaste Rosaline stems almost entirely from the reading of bad love poetry. Romeo’s love for Rosaline, then, seems an immature love, more a statement that he is ready to be in love than actual love. An alternative argument holds that Romeo’s love for Rosaline shows him to be desirous of love with anyone who is beautiful and willing to share his feelings, thereby sullying our understanding of Romeo’s love with Juliet. Over the course of the play, the purity and power of Romeo’s love for Juliet seems to outweigh any concerns about the origin of that love, and therefore any concerns about Rosaline, but the question of Rosaline’s role in the play does offer an important point for consideration.